Guiding Questions:

What is a favorite ESOL lesson or project you love to teach?
What new strategies have you successfully employed this year in your ESOL program?
In which areas would you like more support in re: ESOL instruction?

speaking, reading, writing,listening, pronunciation, multi level instruction,project based learning, technology integration, other ???

Bring your thoughts and ideas to share in May!
We look forward to building our ESOL community!


ESOL CONFERENCE 2013


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ESOL1.jpg ESOL8.jpgESOL2.jpg

Agenda:

  • May 15th Soup and Bread Supper 6:00-8:00

  • Jacqueline will present ESL experience in Laos (20-30 minutes)
  • Katya will present volunteering project video (15 minutes)
  • Participant sharing
    • Participants will be sent questions and ideas for sharing prior to the conference
    • Ellen will create guiding questions for evening to share successes and challenges
    • Questions will be sent via the Wiki

  • May 16th Meeting Day
    • Immigration presentation and questions (8:30-9:30)
    • Activity One: Share Across America Projects
    • Explore Wiki and ELL U with participants
    • Round table
      • Address challenges that were shared in the evening (brainstorm solutions)
    • Introduce alternative assessment to Best Plus


Conference 2013 report:

ESOL Conference Summary -Wed. Night- May 15, 2013
1. Welcome from Margaret and an overview of the history of Montana ESOL professional development.
2. Introductions and attendees: Mike Schachte-Bitterroot, Jackie Teasedale-Missoula ABLE, Shannon Davis- Billings, Shelley Freeze-Miles Community College, Margie Munts-Flathead Community College, Bobbie Kandarian-Flathead Valley Community College, Joanna Stratman and Ellen Guettler from Bozeman ABLE, Rosanne Bos Dawson Community College, Margaret Bowles and Carol Flynn from OPI in attendance.

3. Laos Trip: Jackie shared a wonderful slide show about her ESL exchange trip to Laos as part of the South East Asia Women Empowerment Program. She talked the geographic, political, and historical background of Laos. Jackie shared that the State Dept. sponsored the exchange trip. Jackie shared about her Laotian co-teacher, Queson, and their partnership to promote women as professionals in Laos. Jackie shared slides of the university’s common area –all outdoor open air classrooms. The Luxemburg Development Corp is renovating. Their university students are about at the level of our ESL students in the US Adult Ed programs. On day one, Jackie sorted entrance exams. The director was at about an Intermediate Low ESL level. In Laos, English is EFL because there are not outside opportunities to learn. They have no technology; only one electronic typewriter exited on site. Jackie helped establish an English Language Lab. She taught classes of 50 people; most were studying to become lawyers. Lao is a Buddhist country. As per tradition, everyone was barefoot in the buildings. Jackie did some teacher training. She introduced the SMART Learning strategies and study skill strategies to both students and teachers. The Laotian Monks were not part of the pictures because their bodies are not allowed to touch or stand close to women. Jackie shared that she had to shelve her U.S. expectations on education because the Lao university system is much more elementary. There was also a Mung Women’s Empowerment Project on campus to help Mung women sell their handicrafts. The floral displays were amazing. She shared many pictures of SE Asia Women Empowerment Program. St the end of her sojourn, Jackie also got the opportunity to go to Cambodia to visit one of four Cambodian schools that her cousin had established. In her reflections, she shared that the background knowledge of students studying English is very diverse, and she came away with a deeper appreciation and understanding of the diversity of educational experiences that ESOL students come with when they enter our U.S. classroom settings.


4. Volunteer Project: Katya shared her Volunteer Project video and handouts for how to create a volunteer project. Many of her ESOL students volunteer at area nonprofits, and they made a video sharing where and how they give back to the community. Katya is currently helping the Great Falls ABE program make an ABLE Wiki page as well.


5. State Perspective: Margaret shared the accountability guidelines for the EL/Civics grant funding:
  • State Performance Targets come with federal expectations re: Educational Functioning Gain (EFL) levels. Margaret encouraged teachers to keep a close eye on the ESOL EFL targets for the 6 ESOL levels.
  • ABE and ESOL are under the Workforce Grants, so it is important to keep that focus and accountability. The negotiated targets with the US Department are negotiated annually based on the previous year data. Watch targets and get into MABLE to ensure proper post testing. Mt ABLE need to get out of the bottom quartile so we can apply for Incentive Grants from the WIA, ABLE, and Carl Perkins Grants. States that fail to meet EFL targets will get technical support by the feds and do not qualify for incentive grants.
  • MABLE: There are ten reporting tables: Table 4 is the most important. It will indicate students enrolled, number of hours in attendance, and number post tested. Margaret stressed that the MABLE and EFL gains are a true reality check because those percentages impact future funding. The total for state numbers for reportable ESOL students was 178. The ESOL grant is $60,000. Today it is a 1.1 million dollar grant when 5 years ago it was a 1.5 million dollar grant. Our state is seeing more cuts and increased accountability. In 2012, the ESOL narrative written by Margaret reflects the transient population in ESOL. Right now, our numbers are looking good—173 so far. We typically make all but one or two level gains in ESOL. Please be a little more cognitive of the targets. TABLE 4B shows the students that post-test. Margaret shared, “Don’t hesitate to comb the city!” There are positives in the “accountability piece” because it helps us strive to do our best for our students.”
  • Group discussion ensued about ESOL students who transition to TABE or get “mis-placed’ in the assessment cycle. The group concurred that it is best to Pretest with the Best Plus, and integrate with time into ABE. The 12 hours rule for counting students is a bit arbitrary, unlike the EFL hours that are psychometrically set by testing companies.
  • RE: Funding: Montana gets $525,000 from the state legislature. There is a need to organize and talk to the state superintendent to get the state allocation bumped up!
  • Immigration Bill -ABE will not be positively impacted fiscally.

Meeting adjourned at 7:50 pm.


2013 ESOL Conference Summary - Thursday, May 16, 2013

8:30 AM Welcome and Introductions:
Mike Schachte-Literacy Bitterroot, Joanna Stratman and Ellen Guettler from Bozeman ABLE, Jackie Teasdale-Missoula, MT., Shannon Davis- Billings, Shelley Freeze-Miles Community College, Irina Payne-Great Falls Public Schools, Margie Munts-Flathead Community College, Bobbie Kandarian-Flathead Valley Community College, Rosanne Bos-Dawson Community College. Katie Gray-Belgrade Public Schools, Suzy Williams-Helena School District, Margaret Bowles and Carol Flynn from OPI in attendance.
Attendees introduced themselves to the guest speaker,Jodi Bard, of the Field Office Director for the Department of Immigration Service. Her office processes green cards and naturalization services. She is open to travelling to MT sites to present immigration information or steps for completing the naturalization process. Her contact information:

US Dept. of Homeland Security
Helena Office
2800Skyway Drive
Helena, MT 59612
PH: (406) 441-3310 tel. Personal message machine: (406) 441-3334-local number to leave message for individual questions. Contact email: Jodi.bard@dhs.gov

Jody gave an hour long presentation and shared many services provided by her department. She encouraged ABLE staff to work with International Study Advisors from MT universities re: the F1 VISA (student visa) and J1 VISA (International Visitor Student Visa with business collaboration visa.)
Jody presented a general overview of the immigration process. Since 2003, the Immigration Department has been housed under the Department of Homeland Security which also includes Customs and Border Protection, Citizenship, Immigration Services, and ICE. There are 26 districts in the department. Dept. of State issues nonimmigrant visas F1 and V1 visas. The Department of Labor issues the J1 Visas. The Federal Courts have exclusive jurisdiction over giving the oath of citizenship.

Jody defined the following terms and discussed key points:

Immigration and Nationality Act: Cycle times for N400s are now 3.5 months. Each amendment to the law sets off a complex chain of document editing and amendments.
Definitions:
Nonimmigrant-visitors to the US for a short period of time-temporary specialized workers/agriculture
Immigrants- people who were born abroad and want to make the U.S. their home
Visa: issued by the Department of State. I94s are now electronic.
FI: Shows duration of status.
Immigrant visas are permanent, family based, and/or employment based.
Green Card: Change often due to counterfitting-holigram, black light.
Steps to get a green card:
US Citizens: Spouse children, parents and siblings can apply.
Permanent Residents: U.S. can file for their spouses and children.
Visa bulletin is available from Dept. of state Website: **www.state.gov** This defines dates for US admittance from specific countries. Unless an immediate relative, people should file ASAP because there is a several year back log.
Refugees can request asylum for religious, political, or fear of violence if they meet the eligibility requirements.
Filing for application requires the following:
  • 3-5 years continuous residence prior to filings, physically present for at least 1.5 years
  • Must live in the jurisdiction for 90 days prior to filing
  • must be good moral character, have basic knowledge of English, US civics and attachment to the constitution
  • 3 years if you married to a citizen, 5 years for the rest
  • 3-3-3 Rule: Permanent resident, same citizen for 3 years, citizen spouse must be an American citizen for 3 years.
  • If you leave, you must file a 470 before you leave. If you leave for a year, you have to start over on your permanent resident status.

E Verify: System to verify if people are here legally to work. It is a partnership between the Dept. of Homeland Security and The IRS. It does not show immigration status, it simply reduces unauthorized employment. E Verify protects civil liberties and employee privacy. The I9 form is the basis for this information. Discussion ensued on issues that teachers have encountered regarding visas.
Jody shared handouts for visa status change.

How does divorce affect a status? If a K1 (fiancé visa) visa falls through, must be married within 90 days. She can divorce after that. As long as she doesn’t marry, she is OK. Conditional visa says she got married in good faith, VOWA-(Violence Against Women Act)-File I360 and prove they are battered. Prove the abuse visa affidavits, police reports, threats by mates re: immigration status. Immigrant can file I45 and get a green card.

Break 9:50 AM-10:00 AM

10:00 AM: Best Literacy: Katya shared an overview of the Best literacy assessment and the website.
Participants looked through the Best Plus Literacy booklets. They are a hand scored assessment.

TABE CLAS-E: Mike Johnson, from McGraw Hill, presented on TABE CLAS-E (Complete Language Assessment System.) It is aligned with NRS and state standards, TESOL standards Common European Frameworks and Canadian Standards. CLAS-E will link into TABE scores in reading, writing, speaking and listening. Each state sets their own rules as to which of the 4 tests they require. CLAS-E -A and B- (pre and posttests levels 1-4)

CLAS-E Assessment Steps:
Step 1 Locator test (1and 2) – (Locator is optional for lowest students.)
Step 2. Administer Locator test 1&2
Step 3. Take test
Step 4. Results/ student placement

The CLAS-E locator assesses reading, writing, listening, and speaking.
Mike shared the correlation to the TABE CLAS-E and TABE scores. It helps students transition into the ABE room. There is a recommended criterion for exiting: Students need to demonstrate proficiency in 3 of 4 sub tests. Discussion ensued about state policy and NRS reporting for CASA-E.

Feedback:
After a broad discussion, it was suggested that MT pilot the CLAS-E assessment. Margaret shared that the programming changes in MABLE need to be addressed. Margaret will request a sample for piloting in the Great Falls site, and Literacy Bitterroot. Margaret will also contact states that are using these assessments and share their feedback with the group.

Across America Project Based Learning Sharing:
Katya and Joanna shared their “Across America” projects with the group. See the MT ESOL WIKI to see their PowerPoints and projects! Katya’s students made brochures, created PowerPoints on each of the assigned states in teams, and presented their findings back to the main group with video recordings and feedback. Joanna Stratman shared her site projects with the group using Ipads and Near Pod technology to show how she integrates this new technology with her students as they work with technology on their state projects.

Wiki Presentation: Katya shared two videos: one about Project Based Learning and one about WIKIS.
Both are posted and accessible for future viewing on the ESOL WIKI. (Thanks to Katya!) Katya then modeled how to navigate the WIKI and the myriad of resources available on the site. There is everything from the citizenship curriculum and downloadable immigration forms to copious amounts of online technology for ESOL instruction in listening, speaking reading, spelling, writing, as well as online PD opportunities. All participants were encouraged to email Katya at Katya_Irish@gfps.k12.mt.us if they have not yet signed up to be a member of the ESOL WIKI. This is the hyperlink to access the WIKI once you have become a member: http://mtlincs-esl.wikispaces.com/ MT Lincs also has the web address and access links to the WIKI, so check it all out! Ellen shared about the professional development links available through the WIKI through ELL University: [[%20http:/www.ell-u.org/about_us/| http://www.ell-u.org/about_us/]] A discussion ensued about future goals and usage of the WIKI. There was a renewed enthusiasm to incorporate the WIKI more thoroughly next year as the hub for our professional discussions and curriculum sharing. The ESOL planning team will plan with Margaret on “Next Steps”to further integrate the WIKI into all MT sites in the year ahead.

Teacher Sharings:
Bobbi shared that her favorite curriculum idea is Easy English. It has many easy to read stories and activities for the ESL student. Others shared that they also use VOA English and News for You.
Jackie shared a strategy she liked using a page of a monthly calendar schedule. It is a language rich activity that includes use of ordinal numbers. Make your own schedule, share with others. Katya added that students can create an online calendar. Margie shared a DMV manual in big print. It comes with the audio and practice tests. Books available at the DMV office or online in the ESOL WIKI.
Shannon shared that the drivers licenses are available in other languages. Joanna shared how she integrates the Near Pod app, and she shared her love of teaching holiday lessons.
She also recommended AZAR .com for grammar lessons.

Closure: Margaret brought the conference to closure. She shared next steps:
1. Next ESOL meeting will be in September at the Data Quality Conference.
(HI Set will do a half day workshop at the DQ conference. The HI Set staff will welcome feedback.)
2. Follow up activities:
Margaret will call Mike from Mc Graw Hill CLAS-E re: pilot program with Great Falls and Bitterroot.
3. Margaret will contact three states that use Best Literacy and TABECLAS-E and compile their input for
our review.
4. Carol will make an ESOL Conference attendee distribution list.
5. The ESOL CORE team will debrief and plan ways to make the WIKI more accessible.
6. Performance based learning: we are all going narrower and deeper.
7. Attendees voted to keep spring meeting small again next year.
8. Margaret will get more Naturalization Tool Kits to sites that need them if you contact her office
and request one.

Conference ended at approximately 2:40 pm.



Conference 2013 report:

ESOL Conference Summary -Wed. Night- May 15, 2013
1. Welcome from Margaret and an overview of the history of Montana ESOL professional development.
2. Introductions and attendees: Mike Schachte-Bitterroot, Jackie Teasedale-Missoula ABLE, Shannon Davis- Billings, Shelley Freeze-Miles Community College, Margie Munts-Flathead Community College, Bobbie Kandarian-Flathead Valley Community College, Joanna Stratman and Ellen Guettler from Bozeman ABLE, Rosanne Bos Dawson Community College, Margaret Bowles and Carol Flynn from OPI in attendance.

3. Laos Trip: Jackie shared a wonderful slide show about her ESL exchange trip to Laos as part of the South East Asia Women Empowerment Program. She talked the geographic, political, and historical background of Laos. Jackie shared that the State Dept. sponsored the exchange trip. Jackie shared about her Laotian co-teacher, Queson, and their partnership to promote women as professionals in Laos. Jackie shared slides of the university’s common area –all outdoor open air classrooms. The Luxemburg Development Corp is renovating. Their university students are about at the level of our ESL students in the US Adult Ed programs. On day one, Jackie sorted entrance exams. The director was at about an Intermediate Low ESL level. In Laos, English is EFL because there are not outside opportunities to learn. They have no technology; only one electronic typewriter exited on site. Jackie helped establish an English Language Lab. She taught classes of 50 people; most were studying to become lawyers. Lao is a Buddhist country. As per tradition, everyone was barefoot in the buildings. Jackie did some teacher training. She introduced the SMART Learning strategies and study skill strategies to both students and teachers. The Laotian Monks were not part of the pictures because their bodies are not allowed to touch or stand close to women. Jackie shared that she had to shelve her U.S. expectations on education because the Lao university system is much more elementary. There was also a Mung Women’s Empowerment Project on campus to help Mung women sell their handicrafts. The floral displays were amazing. She shared many pictures of SE Asia Women Empowerment Program. St the end of her sojourn, Jackie also got the opportunity to go to Cambodia to visit one of four Cambodian schools that her cousin had established. In her reflections, she shared that the background knowledge of students studying English is very diverse, and she came away with a deeper appreciation and understanding of the diversity of educational experiences that ESOL students come with when they enter our U.S. classroom settings.


4. Volunteer Project: Katya shared her Volunteer Project video and handouts for how to create a volunteer project. Many of her ESOL students volunteer at area nonprofits, and they made a video sharing where and how they give back to the community. Katya is currently helping the Great Falls ABE program make an ABLE Wiki page as well.


5. State Perspective: Margaret shared the accountability guidelines for the EL/Civics grant funding:
  • State Performance Targets come with federal expectations re: Educational Functioning Gain (EFL) levels. Margaret encouraged teachers to keep a close eye on the ESOL EFL targets for the 6 ESOL levels.
  • ABE and ESOL are under the Workforce Grants, so it is important to keep that focus and accountability. The negotiated targets with the US Department are negotiated annually based on the previous year data. Watch targets and get into MABLE to ensure proper post testing. Mt ABLE need to get out of the bottom quartile so we can apply for Incentive Grants from the WIA, ABLE, and Carl Perkins Grants. States that fail to meet EFL targets will get technical support by the feds and do not qualify for incentive grants.
  • MABLE: There are ten reporting tables: Table 4 is the most important. It will indicate students enrolled, number of hours in attendance, and number post tested. Margaret stressed that the MABLE and EFL gains are a true reality check because those percentages impact future funding. The total for state numbers for reportable ESOL students was 178. The ESOL grant is $60,000. Today it is a 1.1 million dollar grant when 5 years ago it was a 1.5 million dollar grant. Our state is seeing more cuts and increased accountability. In 2012, the ESOL narrative written by Margaret reflects the transient population in ESOL. Right now, our numbers are looking good—173 so far. We typically make all but one or two level gains in ESOL. Please be a little more cognitive of the targets. TABLE 4B shows the students that post-test. Margaret shared, “Don’t hesitate to comb the city!” There are positives in the “accountability piece” because it helps us strive to do our best for our students.”
  • Group discussion ensued about ESOL students who transition to TABE or get “mis-placed’ in the assessment cycle. The group concurred that it is best to Pretest with the Best Plus, and integrate with time into ABE. The 12 hours rule for counting students is a bit arbitrary, unlike the EFL hours that are psychometrically set by testing companies.
  • RE: Funding: Montana gets $525,000 from the state legislature. There is a need to organize and talk to the state superintendent to get the state allocation bumped up!
  • Immigration Bill -ABE will not be positively impacted fiscally.

Meeting adjourned at 7:50 pm.


2013 ESOL Conference Summary - Thursday, May 16, 2013

8:30 AM Welcome and Introductions:
Mike Schachte-Literacy Bitterroot, Joanna Stratman and Ellen Guettler from Bozeman ABLE, Jackie Teasdale-Missoula, MT., Shannon Davis- Billings, Shelley Freeze-Miles Community College, Irina Payne-Great Falls Public Schools, Margie Munts-Flathead Community College, Bobbie Kandarian-Flathead Valley Community College, Rosanne Bos-Dawson Community College. Katie Gray-Belgrade Public Schools, Suzy Williams-Helena School District, Margaret Bowles and Carol Flynn from OPI in attendance.
Attendees introduced themselves to the guest speaker,Jodi Bard, of the Field Office Director for the Department of Immigration Service. Her office processes green cards and naturalization services. She is open to travelling to MT sites to present immigration information or steps for completing the naturalization process. Her contact information:

US Dept. of Homeland Security
Helena Office
2800Skyway Drive
Helena, MT 59612
PH: (406) 441-3310 tel. Personal message machine: (406) 441-3334-local number to leave message for individual questions. Contact email: Jodi.bard@dhs.gov

Jody gave an hour long presentation and shared many services provided by her department. She encouraged ABLE staff to work with International Study Advisors from MT universities re: the F1 VISA (student visa) and J1 VISA (International Visitor Student Visa with business collaboration visa.)
Jody presented a general overview of the immigration process. Since 2003, the Immigration Department has been housed under the Department of Homeland Security which also includes Customs and Border Protection, Citizenship, Immigration Services, and ICE. There are 26 districts in the department. Dept. of State issues nonimmigrant visas F1 and V1 visas. The Department of Labor issues the J1 Visas. The Federal Courts have exclusive jurisdiction over giving the oath of citizenship.

Jody defined the following terms and discussed key points:

Immigration and Nationality Act: Cycle times for N400s are now 3.5 months. Each amendment to the law sets off a complex chain of document editing and amendments.
Definitions:
Nonimmigrant-visitors to the US for a short period of time-temporary specialized workers/agriculture
Immigrants- people who were born abroad and want to make the U.S. their home
Visa: issued by the Department of State. I94s are now electronic.
FI: Shows duration of status.
Immigrant visas are permanent, family based, and/or employment based.
Green Card: Change often due to counterfitting-holigram, black light.
Steps to get a green card:
US Citizens: Spouse children, parents and siblings can apply.
Permanent Residents: U.S. can file for their spouses and children.
Visa bulletin is available from Dept. of state Website: **www.state.gov** This defines dates for US admittance from specific countries. Unless an immediate relative, people should file ASAP because there is a several year back log.
Refugees can request asylum for religious, political, or fear of violence if they meet the eligibility requirements.
Filing for application requires the following:
  • 3-5 years continuous residence prior to filings, physically present for at least 1.5 years
  • Must live in the jurisdiction for 90 days prior to filing
  • must be good moral character, have basic knowledge of English, US civics and attachment to the constitution
  • 3 years if you married to a citizen, 5 years for the rest
  • 3-3-3 Rule: Permanent resident, same citizen for 3 years, citizen spouse must be an American citizen for 3 years.
  • If you leave, you must file a 470 before you leave. If you leave for a year, you have to start over on your permanent resident status.

E Verify: System to verify if people are here legally to work. It is a partnership between the Dept. of Homeland Security and The IRS. It does not show immigration status, it simply reduces unauthorized employment. E Verify protects civil liberties and employee privacy. The I9 form is the basis for this information. Discussion ensued on issues that teachers have encountered regarding visas.
Jody shared handouts for visa status change.

How does divorce affect a status? If a K1 (fiancé visa) visa falls through, must be married within 90 days. She can divorce after that. As long as she doesn’t marry, she is OK. Conditional visa says she got married in good faith, VOWA-(Violence Against Women Act)-File I360 and prove they are battered. Prove the abuse visa affidavits, police reports, threats by mates re: immigration status. Immigrant can file I45 and get a green card.

Break 9:50 AM-10:00 AM

10:00 AM: Best Literacy: Katya shared an overview of the Best literacy assessment and the website.
Participants looked through the Best Plus Literacy booklets. They are a hand scored assessment.

TABE CLAS-E: Mike Johnson, from McGraw Hill, presented on TABE CLAS-E (Complete Language Assessment System.) It is aligned with NRS and state standards, TESOL standards Common European Frameworks and Canadian Standards. CLAS-E will link into TABE scores in reading, writing, speaking and listening. Each state sets their own rules as to which of the 4 tests they require. CLAS-E -A and B- (pre and posttests levels 1-4)

CLAS-E Assessment Steps:
Step 1 Locator test (1and 2) – (Locator is optional for lowest students.)
Step 2. Administer Locator test 1&2
Step 3. Take test
Step 4. Results/ student placement

The CLAS-E locator assesses reading, writing, listening, and speaking.
Mike shared the correlation to the TABE CLAS-E and TABE scores. It helps students transition into the ABE room. There is a recommended criterion for exiting: Students need to demonstrate proficiency in 3 of 4 sub tests. Discussion ensued about state policy and NRS reporting for CASA-E.

Feedback:
After a broad discussion, it was suggested that MT pilot the CLAS-E assessment. Margaret shared that the programming changes in MABLE need to be addressed. Margaret will request a sample for piloting in the Great Falls site, and Literacy Bitterroot. Margaret will also contact states that are using these assessments and share their feedback with the group.

Across America Project Based Learning Sharing:
Katya and Joanna shared their “Across America” projects with the group. See the MT ESOL WIKI to see their PowerPoints and projects! Katya’s students made brochures, created PowerPoints on each of the assigned states in teams, and presented their findings back to the main group with video recordings and feedback. Joanna Stratman shared her site projects with the group using Ipads and Near Pod technology to show how she integrates this new technology with her students as they work with technology on their state projects.

Wiki Presentation: Katya shared two videos: one about Project Based Learning and one about WIKIS.
Both are posted and accessible for future viewing on the ESOL WIKI. (Thanks to Katya!) Katya then modeled how to navigate the WIKI and the myriad of resources available on the site. There is everything from the citizenship curriculum and downloadable immigration forms to copious amounts of online technology for ESOL instruction in listening, speaking reading, spelling, writing, as well as online PD opportunities. All participants were encouraged to email Katya at Katya_Irish@gfps.k12.mt.us if they have not yet signed up to be a member of the ESOL WIKI. This is the hyperlink to access the WIKI once you have become a member: http://mtlincs-esl.wikispaces.com/ MT Lincs also has the web address and access links to the WIKI, so check it all out! Ellen shared about the professional development links available through the WIKI through ELL University: [[%20http:/www.ell-u.org/about_us/| http://www.ell-u.org/about_us/]] A discussion ensued about future goals and usage of the WIKI. There was a renewed enthusiasm to incorporate the WIKI more thoroughly next year as the hub for our professional discussions and curriculum sharing. The ESOL planning team will plan with Margaret on “Next Steps”to further integrate the WIKI into all MT sites in the year ahead.

Teacher Sharings:
Bobbi shared that her favorite curriculum idea is Easy English. It has many easy to read stories and activities for the ESL student. Others shared that they also use VOA English and News for You.
Jackie shared a strategy she liked using a page of a monthly calendar schedule. It is a language rich activity that includes use of ordinal numbers. Make your own schedule, share with others. Katya added that students can create an online calendar. Margie shared a DMV manual in big print. It comes with the audio and practice tests. Books available at the DMV office or online in the ESOL WIKI.
Shannon shared that the drivers licenses are available in other languages. Joanna shared how she integrates the Near Pod app, and she shared her love of teaching holiday lessons.
She also recommended AZAR .com for grammar lessons.

Closure: Margaret brought the conference to closure. She shared next steps:
1. Next ESOL meeting will be in September at the Data Quality Conference.
(HI Set will do a half day workshop at the DQ conference. The HI Set staff will welcome feedback.)
2. Follow up activities:
Margaret will call Mike from Mc Graw Hill CLAS-E re: pilot program with Great Falls and Bitterroot.
3. Margaret will contact three states that use Best Literacy and TABECLAS-E and compile their input for
our review.
4. Carol will make an ESOL Conference attendee distribution list.
5. The ESOL CORE team will debrief and plan ways to make the WIKI more accessible.
6. Performance based learning: we are all going narrower and deeper.
7. Attendees voted to keep spring meeting small again next year.
8. Margaret will get more Naturalization Tool Kits to sites that need them if you contact her office
and request one.

Conference ended at approximately 2:40 pm.